Archive for November, 2018

Take the scenic route to the Highlands!

November 26th, 2018

 

Ditch the bustling cities for a refreshing route dishing out captivating scenery, stunning coastline and charming villages. Take a van ride to one or more of the locations listed below, stop by the regions historical sites, and you’ll understand why nothing quite beats a scenic ride through the gorgeous landscapes of the UK! Need a van? Take a look at Camperbug’s fantastic motorhome hire options!

 

Are you ready to hit the Highlands?

 

Loch Lomond. Image by fschnell on Visual Hunt / CC BY

 

Take the ride along the gateway to the Highlands – the route from Glasgow to Fort William –, and you’re in for a scenic treat!  A captivating 108 miles on the A82 unusually takes an estimated 3 hours to complete, but we recommend saving an entire day to savour the natural beauty around you, not to mention the fantastic Instagram worthy photography. We recommend driving north along Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Your drive will ascend into the Black mountains with the hauntingly beautiful Rannoch Moor set on your right. The highway will take you into Glen Coe, and the next 12 miles will contain grand volcanic mountain vistas. You’ll have the opportunity to savour the best views of the Three Sisters south of the A82 from the Three Sisters Point of View parking, set an estimated four miles from the Glencoe Visitor Center.

 

The Three Sisters of Glencoe. Image by Greg_Men on Flickr

 

Use the GPS coordinates of N56º 40′ 3.72″, W4º 59′ 11.4″ to reach the location. At South Ballachulish, you’ll see a bridge that will transport you across the juncture where Loch Leven rests at your east. From there it’s a straight route to Fort William along the A82 and the edge of Loch Linnhe. The tallest mountain of the British Isles, Ben Nevis will peek at you along the way!

 

Loch Leven, Glencoe. Image by jdufrenoy on Visual hunt / CC BY-ND

 

If time permits, take a right onto the B863 at the village of Glencoe and take a ride along the borders of Loch Leven. The total route is a mere 16 miles. Once you pass the village of Kinlochleven, continue westward beside the northern shore of the Loch with a refreshing stop at Loch Leven Seafood Café  where you’ll dine on fresh Scottish Lobster scallops and more (❤) while enjoying fantastic lake views.    Continue towards North Ballachulish, and with a swift right turn, you’re back on the A82!

 

Loch Lochy. Image by stu smith on Flickr

 

If you’re eager to see the most of the pretty Loch Lochy, remain on the A82 when you pass Fort William. You’ll relish the stunning views along the south banks of Loch Lochy, the north shores of Loch Ness all the way to the city of Inverness.

 

Find an Inverness shire motorhome with Camperbug!

 

Alternatively, hire Handsome Howard!

 

Check out this dashing campervan only on Camperbug campervan hires!

 

He’s a smashing Volkswagen LT 35 that’ll easily sleep two. Fitted with a hydraulic elevating roof, twin-burner gas hob and a small outbacker wood burning stove, Howards can’t wait to embark on his next adventure! Speak to his owners in Inverness shire, today!

 

Loch Lomond. Image by nick.amoscato on Visual hunt / CC BY

 

If you don’t have a day to spare, take the shorter path on the A28, north of Dumbarton along the western boundary of  Loch Lomond. A 26-mile ride will transport you to the peak of the loch with diverse vistas along the way. The tallest mountain in the region, Ben Lomond cheerfully bobs in and out of view with every bend you’ll take. Peaks embraced by and clothed in heather set in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park will sporadically make way dense forestry adorning the slopes of Queen Elizabeth Forest Park and Rowardennan Forest.

 

Ben Lomond. Image by Neillwphoto on Visual hunt / CC BY-SA

 

If you’re on the lookout for penthouse views over northern Lake District, swap a campsite for a cave!

 

 

 

 

 

Swap a campsite for a cave at Lake District!

November 21st, 2018

 

If you’re on the lookout for penthouse views over northern Lake District, we’ve got just the place! Trade an overnight campsite stayover in favour of the captivating “Priest’s Hole! The cave is neither dark nor foreboding, and a shallow overhang maintains effective protection from the elements. The cave contains a wide mouth which keeps claustrophobia at bay, and you’re bound to find half-empty camping stove canisters, a collection of groundsheets and tarps plus, most excitingly, a visitors book and pen with comments and tales of outdoor aficionadi who’ve camped high up on the fell titled Dove Crag. Get a Cumbria campervan hire with Camperbug!

 

 

Image by Masa Sakano on Flickr

 

Pack

 

Do remember that caves are not dry places and as the Priest’s Hole contains a wide opening do make sure to pack in a plenty of warm clothing, adequate equipment to prepare hot food and drink, waterproof bivvy for your sleeping bag and a sheet of tarp to help ease the sharpness of the rocky cave floor. Do pack in the required quantity of water for your stay as the climb down is tiring.

 

Stock up

 

You can stock up on food and water at the nearest village, Patterdale while camping supplies are available in the towns of Ambleside or Keswick.

 

Reach

Lake District is a popular location for camping so you’ll have a cornucopia of campsites to leave your campervan overnight. It’s easiest to reach the cave from the village of Patterdale.

 

 

Image by lydsjackson on Instagram

 

The itinerary

 

Day one

 

Enter via the car park and follow the wide pathway which passes the trail of trees laid along the edge of Brothers Water until you reach a farm at Hartsop Hall. Once you reach the farm, continue forward, where you’ll see the path divide into two. Take the lighter path on the far right which will proceed along an uphill climb. You’ll pass a wall line, ruined gates and old stiles along the way until the trees part to make way for the waters of Dovedale Beck waterfall.

 

Be sure to avoid crossing the bridge to the southern bank. Keep the path to your left as you proceed along the south bank, and soon the track will pass over boulders and rocks, with some old buildings on your right. If the weather is clear, it is from this point that you’ll be able to see the first sighting of the cave. The path becomes increasingly steeper before the terrain evens out with more grass. You’ll need to walk towards a large boulder that rests along of the track.

 

When you reach the boulder, turn left, and you’ll see a path resembling a sheep track. Follow the route which will snake around a side of rocks to your left. You may have to use your hands to scramble over the rocks however after about five minutes of climbing and walking; you’ll reach the entrance to the Priest Hole.

 

Reggie is ready to go!

 

Reggie is rearing to go! He’s a smashing VW Transporter T5 who’ll comfortably sleep three adventurers! To make a campervan reservation, click here!

 

Day two

 

Taking the garbage back. Image by Masa Sakano on Flickr

 

Did you fill out the visitor’s book? Be sure to add a comment!   Before retracing your path down to the large boulder, collect all waste. Those who wish to make a quick exit may follow the same way that led to the caves. Proceed uphill towards the centre point between the peaks Dove Crag and Hart Crag, if you’d like to explore the region.  Turn southeast to reach the summit of the mountain you spend the night from where you can follow the path back to the cols and proceed towards the peak of Hart Crag.

 

When you’ve had your fill of the vistas, follow the very noticeable path northeast which proceeds along the range of Hartsop Above How. The path will drop to the north of Low Wood. Turn onto the road and walk back towards Cow Bridge and you’ll reach your start point!

 

Lovely Old Blue!

 

Old Blue is a gorgeous classic Niagara Blue Bay Window lefthand drive California campervan, lovingly fitted with modern Van Wurks camping interior. Take a look and if you like what you see, speak to Old Blue’s owners for reservations!

 

Take a look at Camperbug’s motorhome hire options across the UK or embark on the King Arthur Trail!

 

 

 

 

 

Embark on the King Arthur Trail

November 12th, 2018

 

Legendary British ruler King Arthur is credited with leading armies against the Saxon invaders during the 5th and 6th century. While historians debate the very existence of the king, numerous Arthurian hotspots dot the UK and even inspired Guy Ritchie’s 2017 film King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. Irrespective of the films poor reception and the debate over the actual existence of King Arthur, here are a select number of locations that transport visitors to a time of battles, folklore and medieval history.  Get a classic campervan hire with Camperbug and see the sites in style and comfort!

 

Tintagel Castle

 

Image by Robert Pittman on Flickr

 

Tintagel Castle is said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. It all began with Geoffrey of Monmouth who stated that Arthur drew first breath within the palace walls in his fictionalised Historia Regum Britanniae. The crumbling castle sits proudly atop Cornwall’s craggy coast, encircled by gulls and mystical tales of days when the now derelict castle served as a sturdy fortress to the Romans, Celtic Cornish Kings and perhaps, even King Arthur himself. The ruins date back to around the 13th century, and the surrounding region contains a highly photographed face of Merlin carved into the rock in proximity to the cave known as “Merlin’s Cave”. According to legend, Merlin hid Arthur within the cave as a means of protection.

 

Bubbly Blossom!

Have you met bubbly Blossom? She’s charming VW Transporter T2 and carries her 1970s build with style! Hire her, today! Or find more Cornwall campervan hire options with Camperbug.

 

Cumbria

 

Image by Tom on Flickr

 

Home to the stunning Lake District, Cumbria wins with unending vistas of natural scenery. Eamont Bridge in Cumbria serves as an Arthurian hotspot owing to the fabled King Arthur’s Round Table. The table is a Neolithic henge which is 90 meters in diameter and 50 meters across. The amphitheatre is reputed to be the Kings jousting section.

 

Glastonbury

 

Image by Steve Slater (used to be Wildlife Encounters) on VisualHunt.com / CC BY

 

Famed for its muddy music festival, Glastonbury is also a hotspot for the famed Arthurian legend. According to folklore, Glastonbury Tor which is a conical hill topped with a 14th-century tower called St Michaels tower is said to be the site in which mortally wounded King Arthur hid after a particularly nasty battle.  Glastonbury Tor now looms over docile sheep and green meadows however back in the time of King Arthur the hill enclosed by marshland and was known as the ‘Isle of Avalon.’ Glastonbury Abbey is said to be the final resting place of the legendary king with monks claiming to uncover bones of Queen Guinevere in AD1190.

 

Snowdonia

 

Image by The Ancient Brit. on Visualhunt.com / CC BY

 

Wales is home to many an Arthurian legend, so it’s no surprise that Guy Ritchie chose the loveliest national park to film many scenes of the film. Tryfan Mountain in the Ogwen Valley was featured prominently in the movie, and the lake Llyn Llydaw which is shadowed by Nant Gwynant is said to be the location where Knight Sir Bedivere threw Excalibur after King Arthur’s death.

 

The Isle of Skye

Image by Robert J Heath on Visual hunt / CC BY

 

The Isle of Skye features in many great films including Macbeth and the BFG, and the stunning vistas featured in King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. The weather is quite unpredictable however that doesn’t deter hikers who are drawn to the islands breathtaking landscapes, welcoming pubs and independent rest houses.

 

Delightful Dash!

Delightful Dash is ready to dash to your chosen location. He’s a handsome Rimor 2017 motorhome and will comfortably sleep, five passengers!

 

Windsor Great Park

 

Image by Edmund Gall on Flickr

 

You may struggle to locate the mysterious castle of Camelot; however, many impressive fortresses dot Britain. The grounds of Windsor Castle were used in the film and considering the park 2,020 hectares are teeming with roaming deer gracefully stepping through Oak Forests, its best to savour the location in the saddle.

 

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