Visiting the top 05 islands in Ireland  February 7th, 2019

 

The word island generally summons images of tropical climates and refreshing breezes dancing through the palm trees. Ireland’s isles may not be the quintessential island, but their rugged charm and varying terrain entice a ranger of wanders. Enjoy a pint by the sea or leave the bustle behind in favour of tourist-free heaven! Here are our top picks. To get the most out of your trip, ditch the traditional hotel stay for a campervan or motorhome hire. Don’t be held back by check-out times, hotel room views or itineraries!

 

Aran Islands

 

Aran Islands. Image by yourwayireland on Instagram

 

Set off the west coast of Ireland, at the mouth of Galway Bay and Doolin, Aran Islands is an archipelago of three rock-strewn islands. The isles are best known for its prehistoric relics like Dun Aonghasa (a World Heritage Site), stunning natural beauty and a 14th-century castle. The locals speak a blend of Irish and English, and there is a camping and glamping site on Inis Mór –the largest of the three islands. If you’d like to relish the tranquil lifestyle, local traditions, stunning vistas and thriving wildlife hop on a ferry that departs from Rossaveal and Doolin.

 

Smashing Smarty!

 

If you’re looking for a great van to hire for your journey to Aran Islands, stunning Smarty might do the trick! He’s a large A-Class motorhome that will comfortably transport five passengers.  Contact his owners for reservations and more information!

 

The Skelligs

 

Fresh catch at The Skelligs. Image by mrpetemadden on Instagram

 

Rising out of the Atlantic, the Skelligs islands are two inhabitable islands set approximately eight miles at sea in southwestern County Kerry. The islands are named Skellig Michael and the Little Skellig. There is an impeccably restored Christian monastery located on Great Skellig, containing terraced gardens and beehive huts. During the appropriate season, you’ll have the opportunity to see puffins, razorbills, Arctic Tern, Black Guillemot, seals, dolphins, and perhaps even a basking shark! You can reach the island via boat which leaves Bunavalla Pier or drive to Port Magee and take a quick boat ride.

 

Blasket Islands

 

Image by atrickodonnellphotography on the thewildatlanticway, Instagram

 

Set at the tip of Dingle Peninsula, the Blasket Islands are of 6 isles, and once houses over 160 locals. The government evacuated the final 22 citizens in 1953 due to severe living conditions. Today the island resembles a ghost town and contains over 1,100 acres of lush mountain landscape which protect a flourishing community of flora and fauna. Take a ferry to Great Blasket, the largest of the six Blasket islands from Dunquin Harbor and delight in a day of whale watching, walks by the beach, hikes and more!

 

Garnish Island

 

Garinish Island. Image by the thewildatlanticway on Instagram

 

Located in the protective harbour of Glengarriff in Southwest Ireland, Garnish Island packs in quite a punch for a relatively small island. Formerly privately owned by John Annan, the island is best known for the strikingly modelled gardens. The owner at the time, John Annan Bryce worked closely with the garden designer and architect Harold Peto to bring his visions of trimmed Edwardian gardens to life! The island was donated to the Irish public in 1953 by Bryce’s son. Ferry services to the island leave from Glengarriff from March to October. The ferry service includes a trip to seal island were an enthusiastic tame seal colony will welcome you!

 

Achill Island

 

Achill Island. Image by ClarkHodissay on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-ND

 

If you’re heading toward Westport and Mayo, you must include Achill Island to your trip. The isle is the largest off the coast of Ireland and is perhaps the easiest to visit owing to the Michael Davitt Bridge connecting isle and mainland. Human settlements on the island trace as far back as the Neolithic Age and one can bite into the isles incredible history with a visit to the regions abandoned villages, crumbling forts, megalithic tombs and majestic churches. , Presently the population on the island is approximately 2,700 people, and the isle is well-known for fresh offerings of Atlantic seafood while the pubs and bars offer the customary Irish welcome. Achill Island is known for five stunning Blue Flag beaches, towering mountains, stunning vistas, and the spectacular offering of outdoor activities including windsurfing, kitesurfing, swimming, canoeing and kayaking.

 

Stay tuned for more great isles in Ireland or take a read of best locations in Cairngorms National Park to go tent camping!

 

 

 

 

 

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